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Killer seals develop a taste for shark guts

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THAT shark’s fate is sealed. A seal has been spotted turning ecological roles upside-down by killing and eating blue sharks. If this turnabout proves common, ecologists might need to reassess the role of seals in marine ecosystems.

Chris Fallows, a dive-boat operator in Cape Town, South Africa, was photographing 10 blue sharks underwater when a young male Cape fur seal arrived and chased and killed five of them, eating their intestines (African Journal of Marine Science, doi.org/268).

Ordinarily, seals and blue sharks, which are roughly the same size, both prey on much smaller fish, squid and other marine life. Several species of seal also feed on smaller sharks, and blue sharks have been seen pursuing – though not catching – fur seals.

Fallows’s observations are the first time anyone has seen seals preying on such large sharks, says Hugues Benoit of the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans in Moncton, New Brunswick.

Seal attack <i>(Image: Chris Fallows)</i>

Benoit suspects this behaviour is more common than anyone realises. By chowing down on their competitors, seals could alter ocean food webs in unexpected ways, he says. If seals help hold down shark populations, for example, it could boost populations of smaller fish.

If so, fisheries biologists may need to take that into account in managing fish populations.

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